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  1. #1
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    (Re)Painting Mid section

    In the process of swapping powerheads I figured i might as well take the time to clean everything up and re-paint as needed. Because i have access to a powder coating operation yet also am an experienced painter, i flipped a mental coin to decide which way i would go with this project. I decided to go with "wet" paint and this is what i did and why.
    After hours of researching new enamels and epoxies that ive never used before i found a product made by "VHT" that boasts the look and durability of a powder coating. You may be wondering, "If it's so much like powder, why not use powder?" That answer was the tipping point for me. Simply put, touchup is not easy with powder coating. If youre as rough on equipment as i am, even the most durable finish will need a touchup soon. Also, for those that arent familiar, touchup on a powder finish is done with a color match "wet" enamel. Knowing this, all roads lead to skull bone for me. A wet finish is my most practical option especially when i like to do everything myself when possible. Since powder was off the table and i didnt want to break out my spray equipment for such a small job, I went to my local auto parts store and picked up a few cans of gloss black VHT epoxy. Yep, its in a rattle can. So now that i have a coating picked out its time for the prep work. FYI, pick your coating before you prep because different products require different preparations for the best finish. In my case, using VHT epoxy, the prep work was simple. Because the old coating still had a strong bond to the aluminum a complete removal wasnt necessary. A light sanding of the surface finish was all that VHT epoxy requires. The point is to create a matte finish on your base to promote full adhesion of your top coat. VHT suggested a 220 grit for this so i picked up a medium sanding sponge (about 220 grit) and went to work on it. This step only took about an hour. Once i had a nice even dull finish on my base i wiped everything down with soapy water and followed up with a thorough cleaning with acetone and a lint free rag. This is the point where you may want to use a tack cloth to remove any remaining dust, lint, etc. that may be present but in my case it was clean enough. Time to paint.
    If there was ever a rattle can coating that looked as good as a spray finish or powder coating, THIS IS THE STUFF!
    I started with a very light coat to "wet" the surface slightly. Keep in mind that it wasnt actually wet on the first coat. Thats just the best word for it. Think of it as a very light layer on the entire surface. By the time i made it to the end of this coat i immediately began the second. The second coat followed suit with the exact same light spray over the entire surface. Both of these coats are done from about 12 inches away so the overspray is a bit much but also necessary for an even finish. Primer is not required with this so think about these first two coats as a type of priming coat. Per the instructions on the can i waited 10 minutes before applying the next (3rd) layer. This 3rd layer will actually be my 1st full coating that will give me an idea of what the final finish will look like. This time i bring the can closer, somewhere around 8-10 inches away and spray in even overlapping strokes to completely wet the surface. This is the most important step. If you are going to screw up the finish this is where it always happens. Keeping the motion smooth and steady is key to getting an even coat without overbuilding and causing runs. This time i waited 15 minutes and repeated this last step for the 4th final coat. I have to say guys, im very impressed with this paint. I like to think im a fairly good painter but rattle cans always leave a distinct look on the finish. This stuff levels out like it was done in a spray booth! In hindsight i wish i would have taken photos of the whole process but i didnt know at the time that it would be worth sharing with you. Here are a couple photos that will at least give you an idea of how good this stuff lays down. In one pic you can see my mid, un-prepped sitting on the floor next to a powerhead. The next pic is the final finish. Because i dont know how well this stuff will hold up to the elements ill update this thread in the coming months. Overall im very happy with it and for $20 and some time i have a beautiful mid section ready to go back on the boat. The lower unit is next!
    Click image for larger version. 

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    "The character of a man can be easily judged by how he treats those who can do nothing for him"

  2. #2
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    Damn Adam, u explained it better here than on the phone lol. I guess we will see who's goes dull or chipping 1st and get a final result , im not necessarily easy on my junk either ha

  3. Likes Smalltownbassin liked this post
  4. #3
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    Please articulate in detail on your statement highlighted below. Meaning exactly what makes Powdercoating harder to repair than painting. Before I dispute your statement Id like to hear what you have to say. After all youre supposed to "have access to a powder coating operation". Which should also mean you have hands on Powdercoating experience. Id be interested in hearing Facts to back up your statement. After that Ill make my rebuttal and why.

    Quote Originally Posted by Smalltownbassin View Post
    In the process of swapping powerheads I figured i might as well take the time to clean everything up and re-paint as needed. Because i have access to a powder coating operation yet also am an experienced painter, i flipped a mental coin to decide which way i would go with this project. I decided to go with "wet" paint and this is what i did and why.
    After hours of researching new enamels and epoxies that ive never used before i found a product made by "VHT" that boasts the look and durability of a powder coating. You may be wondering, "If it's so much like powder, why not use powder?" That answer was the tipping point for me. Simply put, touchup is not easy with powder coating. If youre as rough on equipment as i am, even the most durable finish will need a touchup soon. Also, for those that arent familiar, touchup on a powder finish is done with a color match "wet" enamel. Knowing this, all roads lead to skull bone for me. A wet finish is my most practical option especially when i like to do everything myself when possible. Since powder was off the table and i didnt want to break out my spray equipment for such a small job, I went to my local auto parts store and picked up a few cans of gloss black VHT epoxy. Yep, its in a rattle can. So now that i have a coating picked out its time for the prep work. FYI, pick your coating before you prep because different products require different preparations for the best finish. In my case, using VHT epoxy, the prep work was simple. Because the old coating still had a strong bond to the aluminum a complete removal wasnt necessary. A light sanding of the surface finish was all that VHT epoxy requires. The point is to create a matte finish on your base to promote full adhesion of your top coat. VHT suggested a 220 grit for this so i picked up a medium sanding sponge (about 220 grit) and went to work on it. This step only took about an hour. Once i had a nice even dull finish on my base i wiped everything down with soapy water and followed up with a thorough cleaning with acetone and a lint free rag. This is the point where you may want to use a tack cloth to remove any remaining dust, lint, etc. that may be present but in my case it was clean enough. Time to paint.
    If there was ever a rattle can coating that looked as good as a spray finish or powder coating, THIS IS THE STUFF!
    I started with a very light coat to "wet" the surface slightly. Keep in mind that it wasnt actually wet on the first coat. Thats just the best word for it. Think of it as a very light layer on the entire surface. By the time i made it to the end of this coat i immediately began the second. The second coat followed suit with the exact same light spray over the entire surface. Both of these coats are done from about 12 inches away so the overspray is a bit much but also necessary for an even finish. Primer is not required with this so think about these first two coats as a type of priming coat. Per the instructions on the can i waited 10 minutes before applying the next (3rd) layer. This 3rd layer will actually be my 1st full coating that will give me an idea of what the final finish will look like. This time i bring the can closer, somewhere around 8-10 inches away and spray in even overlapping strokes to completely wet the surface. This is the most important step. If you are going to screw up the finish this is where it always happens. Keeping the motion smooth and steady is key to getting an even coat without overbuilding and causing runs. This time i waited 15 minutes and repeated this last step for the 4th final coat. I have to say guys, im very impressed with this paint. I like to think im a fairly good painter but rattle cans always leave a distinct look on the finish. This stuff levels out like it was done in a spray booth! In hindsight i wish i would have taken photos of the whole process but i didnt know at the time that it would be worth sharing with you. Here are a couple photos that will at least give you an idea of how good this stuff lays down. In one pic you can see my mid, un-prepped sitting on the floor next to a powerhead. The next pic is the final finish. Because i dont know how well this stuff will hold up to the elements ill update this thread in the coming months. Overall im very happy with it and for $20 and some time i have a beautiful mid section ready to go back on the boat. The lower unit is next!
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20201212_115212.jpg 
Views:	231 
Size:	383.5 KB 
ID:	479210
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20201217_160521.jpg 
Views:	231 
Size:	397.5 KB 
ID:	479211
    Bud Conner "Heathen" "Defending Our Constitution"

    FOR ALL ENGINE APPLICATIONS
    DRY Film Lubricant for Piston Skirts & Cranks + Thermal Barrier Ceramic Coatings for Piston Tops, Combustion Chambers, Valves etc !!

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by HStream1 View Post
    Please articulate in detail on your statement highlighted below. Meaning exactly what makes Powdercoating harder to repair than painting. Before I dispute your statement Id like to hear what you have to say. After all youre supposed to "have access to a powder coating operation". Which should also mean you have hands on Powdercoating experience. Id be interested in hearing Facts to back up your statement. After that Ill make my rebuttal and why.
    Hahaha i didnt know this was a debate! What i do with my equipment shouldnt have any influence on what you have on your mind. By all means, enlighten us. Based on the highlighted text in my post that you quoted, it looks like you disagree with that statement. Let me be clear, as i said, powder coating is the best option for finish durability. In my case, i found a product that i was comfortable trying out that when touchup became necessary, would be very easy to do without removing the entire mid for prep work. This "rattle can" option is something that anyone can do themselves with minimal experience. Sorry if this original post hit you feels Bud but you dont have to worry about "VHT" spray paint taking any of your business. I mean dang, i would at least expect the paint god to admit that its a decent finish for a rattle can lol!
    "The character of a man can be easily judged by how he treats those who can do nothing for him"

  6. Likes Merc 2.5 liked this post
  7. #5
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    Im glad you responded. First I really dont care what you chose to apply to your mid. And yes!! It Looks very Nice. But thats not what I posted to seek. You clearly stated that Powdercoating is not easily Touched up. That couldnt be further from the truth. You have also mentioned "without removing the entire mid for prep work" That is also further from the Truth!! Just because someone doesnt understand something it doesnt mean it cant be done or there isnt a process that has been developed. And in this case That is a fact. There is a process that allows Powdercoating to be repaired in place with powder. While i get paid to train people for a couple Powder supplier companies. Im not going to do it here for free. My point is this. It doesnt matter what process you chose. And im far from being worried about VHT taking any business from me. My point is this. Making statements because its not understood or known by someone can harm a industry. In this case powdercoating. Ive said many times that all powdercoating shops are not equal. And all Powders are not the same. In many cases these shops dont understand varied applications or that there are even different grades of powders for that matter. "I simply ask that you articulate in detail on your statement." Which you chose not to do. Also might I ad!! That when people read such statements that something cant be done or its more difficult etc etc. They tend to believe it without any additional thought. That cant be denied as ive seen it way to many times!!! Just a FYI There are processes in place these days that can Powdercoat Glass, Plastic and even Wood. NO the plastics and wood cant handle the normal cure schedule of 400 degs like metals. But There are proven processes and i was part of a R&D team that worked on developing them. Now Please have a Wonderful Weekend!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Smalltownbassin View Post
    Hahaha i didnt know this was a debate! What i do with my equipment shouldnt have any influence on what you have on your mind. By all means, enlighten us. Based on the highlighted text in my post that you quoted, it looks like you disagree with that statement. Let me be clear, as i said, powder coating is the best option for finish durability. In my case, i found a product that i was comfortable trying out that when touchup became necessary, would be very easy to do without removing the entire mid for prep work. This "rattle can" option is something that anyone can do themselves with minimal experience. Sorry if this original post hit you feels Bud but you dont have to worry about "VHT" spray paint taking any of your business. I mean dang, i would at least expect the paint god to admit that its a decent finish for a rattle can lol!
    Bud Conner "Heathen" "Defending Our Constitution"

    FOR ALL ENGINE APPLICATIONS
    DRY Film Lubricant for Piston Skirts & Cranks + Thermal Barrier Ceramic Coatings for Piston Tops, Combustion Chambers, Valves etc !!

  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by HStream1 View Post
    Im glad you responded. First I really dont care what you chose to apply to your mid. And yes!! It Looks very Nice. But thats not what I posted to seek. You clearly stated that Powdercoating is not easily Touched up. That couldnt be further from the truth. You have also mentioned "without removing the entire mid for prep work" That is also further from the Truth!! Just because someone doesnt understand something it doesnt mean it cant be done or there isnt a process that has been developed. And in this case That is a fact. There is a process that allows Powdercoating to be repaired in place with powder. While i get paid to train people for a couple Powder supplier companies. Im not going to do it here for free. My point is this. It doesnt matter what process you chose. And im far from being worried about VHT taking any business from me. My point is this. Making statements because its not understood or known by someone can harm a industry. In this case powdercoating. Ive said many times that all powdercoating shops are not equal. And all Powders are not the same. In many cases these shops dont understand varied applications or that there are even different grades of powders for that matter. "I simply ask that you articulate in detail on your statement." Which you chose not to do. Also might I ad!! That when people read such statements that something cant be done or its more difficult etc etc. They tend to believe it without any additional thought. That cant be denied as ive seen it way to many times!!! Just a FYI There are processes in place these days that can Powdercoat Glass, Plastic and even Wood. NO the plastics and wood cant handle the normal cure schedule of 400 degs like metals. But There are proven processes and i was part of a R&D team that worked on developing them. Now Please have a Wonderful Weekend!!!
    A good weekend to you to! But....i still stand behind everything ive said. Because something is easy for you does not make it true for everyone. Ive posted MY EXPERIENCE with this rattle can option that im very surprised & pleased with. It can be done with little money and time invested. Most importantly, just about anyone can do it at home (unlike powder coating). The original post is intended to highlight a product that more than likely most people were hesitant to use in this application (DIY). Nothing you have just said lends the idea that it (powder coating) can be done at home with quality results. Comparing apples to oranges here. If the wording of my post offends you, that's on you because it was not the intention.
    "The character of a man can be easily judged by how he treats those who can do nothing for him"

  9. Likes Merc 2.5 liked this post
  10. #7
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    Looks great, rattle can or not!

  11. #8
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    Your mid does look great. The epoxy part of the paint must give it the "strength"? How is it for repairing? About 3 years ago I repainted my Evinrude 135 with Ful Thane urethane automotive paint and in that time my skeg hasn't even gotten scratched. I like it so much I bought the same paint to repaint my "new" 1968 Johnson GT115. I haven't had to attempt repairing any of the paint yet but would this epoxy paint be tuffer than the urethane and do they make many different colors or just the basic blacks and whites?
    Hustler 15' Wildcat / Merc 80
    Hustler 13' Wildcat / Merc 80
    Hustler 13' Picklefork (Experimental) / Merc 80
    Hustler 16' Victor / Evinrude 85
    Hustler 15' Tunnel / Evinrude X115
    Hustler 17' Lark / Suzuki 140 (current)
    Ranger 17' Aztec / Merc 115 (current)
    Hustler 16' Victor / Merc 125 (current)
    Hustler 16' Victor / JohnRude 135 (current and restored)
    Hustler 15' Family Tunnel (current project)
    Hustler 16' Victor / Johnson GT115 (current project)

  12. #9
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    Looks like gloss white or gloss/satin blacks: https://www.vhtpaint.com/specialty/v...-weather-paint

  13. #10
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    Thanks Dave...didn't really delve into it yet.
    Hustler 15' Wildcat / Merc 80
    Hustler 13' Wildcat / Merc 80
    Hustler 13' Picklefork (Experimental) / Merc 80
    Hustler 16' Victor / Evinrude 85
    Hustler 15' Tunnel / Evinrude X115
    Hustler 17' Lark / Suzuki 140 (current)
    Ranger 17' Aztec / Merc 115 (current)
    Hustler 16' Victor / Merc 125 (current)
    Hustler 16' Victor / JohnRude 135 (current and restored)
    Hustler 15' Family Tunnel (current project)
    Hustler 16' Victor / Johnson GT115 (current project)

  14. #11
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    His mid and lower look great , u wouldn't think it was done with rattle can, it layed down very nice and smooth and thick, but the original reason for this post isn't to take work from anyone or scare anyone from powder , I believe everyone knows the powder is superior, but either way , its for the poor diy guy like me that don't really have the extra money to send it off for a professional to do it, but yet still get good results. Time will tell how it holds up

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