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  1. #1

    They make me feel normal (and not a speed junkie)

    About 30 seconds in the crowd gets a thrill.

    About 3 minutes in and they show it in slow motion.

    Last edited by keane; 04-17-2012 at 01:33 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    975
    Quote Originally Posted by keane View Post
    About 30 seconds in the crowd gets a thrill.
    Hydrostream Owners Group

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Fuquay-Varina, NC
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    932
    Fantastic, thanks for posting!!

  4. #4
    0:36 the water is very brown in the area of the crowd.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    The Aussies make us look wimpy
    L.T.


  6. #6
    That really could have been bad... That was some great driving, or just plain panic with a little luck.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    kingman az
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    2,046
    that was ****ing close!!!!...like 282 said it was either great driving , luck or a combination of the two... any way you slice it there were some lucky people in that crowd


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  8. #8

    1984 STV Needlenose 200efi
    So many boats sold, so many regrets

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Loch Erin, Irish Hills Area, SE Michigan
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    14,322
    Pure luck. The hull bow-hooked. This can happen to any performance vee hull, especially outboards. The bow drops, and the forward half of the keel takes over and drives the hull into a violent uncontrolled turn. In this case, it was caused by a slight porpoising while making a high-speed turn.

    There's no "controlling" a hooking hull. You just have to ride it out. Happened to me once. Very scary.
    '89 Hydrostream Vegas XT, '90 Merc 2.4 Bridgeport PCU EFI
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  10. #10
    According to the comments of the spotter listed at the bottom of the video, it was a conscious decision of the driver to continue the hook to the left as opposed to try and recover and risk hitting the crowd. The resulting forces threw the spotter into the driver and broke his arm. But if that was the worst injury, they were lucky.

    I don't think I would want to do much water skiing at those speeds in a narrow river.
    Last edited by keane; 04-17-2012 at 04:05 PM.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by pyro View Post
    Pure luck. The hull bow-hooked. This can happen to any performance vee hull, especially outboards. The bow drops, and the forward half of the keel takes over and drives the hull into a violent uncontrolled turn. In this case, it was caused by a slight porpoising while making a high-speed turn.

    There's no "controlling" a hooking hull. You just have to ride it out. Happened to me once. Very scary.

    You can actually control a hook if you catch it in time by turning the steering wheel and tapping the throttle. Been there done that many times at higher speeds than I care to admit.
    Testing and getting on and over the edge certainly keeps your senses and reactions at their peak.
    The people on shore were very lucky no doubt.
    It looked to me like there could have been some type of mechanical failure since they just drifted to the side and didn't try to get the skiers out of harms way asap.

    I'm going to rephrase a bit.
    You can control a hook before it becomes a hook once you know the feel right before it happens. Kinda like controlling chine walk is the best way to describe it.
    Last edited by props4u2; 04-17-2012 at 10:53 PM.
    Lee Sanderson

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    10 min north of Gulf Shores, AL
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    2,411
    The Lord was watching over those folks that day. Could've been real messy.
    You never know what your faith is, until your faith has been truly tested.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Shreveport, La.
    Posts
    579
    I think Pyro is right about what caused it, but I think the driver steered into it and hit the throttle to make it turn as sharp as it did.
    You can hear the throttle come up in the turn. Probably would have not worked if it had not been a jet.
    Bad luck+driver skill+good luck=lucky day for everybody.

  14. #14
    Notice those fools were back in the water when the 2nd boat came through. Nutz.

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by pyro View Post
    Pure luck. The hull bow-hooked. This can happen to any performance vee hull, especially outboards. The bow drops, and the forward half of the keel takes over and drives the hull into a violent uncontrolled turn. In this case, it was caused by a slight porpoising while making a high-speed turn.

    There's no "controlling" a hooking hull. You just have to ride it out. Happened to me once. Very scary.
    Lucky part was that the driver knew what to do with a hooking jet boat and he had enought room to do it. If in fact this was a conscious move on his part, a high five to him. The Navy SWCCC boat drivers are taught this type of response. I drive many of their boats and the WORST thing to do is to back off the power. As said above, this could have been much worse.
    18 Talon/2.4 carb
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