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  1. #1
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    Is my RIDE PLATE keeping jet too high??

    I took a look at my jet in action w/o the cover and it seems to be on top of the water...I always thought they were supposed to be submerged so they kick the water out?

    I did film it on my cell phone and posted it on youtube (after fixing housing)....

    Anyone know if I should raise or lower my ride plate??? Or how it works when I do raise or lower it??? Holeshot vs. Speed....

    Youtube clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byCA7cZTWp8

    Thanks!!

  2. #2
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    Dec 2009
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    UP of Mi.
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    looks fine to me

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Grand Haven, Michigan
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    Common misconception that the boat is pushed by the jet thrust 'pushing' against the water ... not the case at all, the thrust is developed independently and does not need to push against the water.

    The ride plate should be measured with a long straight edge that starts at least 2 feet forward of the ride plate (flat against the bottom of the hull) to get an idea if the plate is up or down relative to the hull itself (look for a gap indicating the plate has DOWN angle, if it rocks, the plate has UP angle relative to the hull). Make sure the ride plate is FLAT side to side also ... it should not be crooked, but many are and need to be adjusted. Get an angle measuring device (can get cheap ones at Harbor Freight or hardware store), adjust the trailer jack until the hull bottom is neutral/flat, then put the angle measure on the ride plate to determine up/down angle and how many degrees.

    IMO, the ride plate is mostly there to help the ride, and control porpoising in particular. The lower the rear of the plate, the less porpoising you will have, but it will scrub speed ... so if the boat does not 'hop' at all at top speed, adjust the plate up ... keep doing that until you negatively affect handing. Measuring from the hull to the rear of the ride plate, UP is faster and looser, DOWN is slower and more stable, but each boat is unique and some may not need any influence from the plate, while others tend to hop way too easily and need quite a bit of down angle to control porpoising.
    62 mph Glastron CVX20, stock. 80+ mph RXP, not stock. Speed + water = freedom.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
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    Northern ILL.
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    With the insert type pumps, these are not ride plates, they are cavitation plates. They can be used to adjust the ride of the boat, to stop a porpoise. Too much down will cause a bow steer situation, a hand full at speed.
    79 Southwind Tunnel Dragster 540ci BBC

    UMPBA 926 Gas Jet

    My Projects http://s200.photobucket.com/user/Dir...?sort=3&page=1

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